What Do Health Care Jobs Pay?
What Do Health Care Jobs Pay?

What Do Health Care Jobs Pay?

People often pursue careers in medicine with an intent of helping others, yet reality shows most healthcare workers need to also think about paying their bills and affording health insurance and retirement accounts. Therefore, those considering medicine as a potential path should conduct a detailed investigation on average salaries associated with different health care jobs.

At the top of the pay scale are physicians, surgeons, dentists and pharmacists – these individuals typically earn an annual average of over $239,200. Other high-paying healthcare positions include medical hygienists who can earn up to $80400 per year; physician assistants may make as much as $134310 annually.

These individuals provide basic healthcare tasks and assist doctors and nurses. They may assist patients with daily activities, administer medications, monitor patient progress, and track outcomes. Nurses are an essential component of the healthcare workforce and can find employment across a range of settings such as hospitals, private practices and home healthcare agencies – earning an average annual income of $69,000!

Individuals who specialize in treating mental illness, emotional distress or physical disabilities can often find rewarding jobs as therapists. Most states license these professionals and average earnings are estimated at between $78,700-$78,000.

Registered nurses (RNs) are one of the highest-paying healthcare occupations. You can find them working across most healthcare settings and their duties may differ depending on where they work; typically working directly with patients as well as performing minor procedures when necessary.

Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that healthcare worker salaries have seen the greatest overall salary gains during the COVID-19 pandemic, though wage increases vary across health settings – skilled nursing facility employees saw one of the greatest average wage increases while offices of physicians have witnessed some of the lowest average increases.

In addition to those noted previously, this chart displays the average salary for other popular health care occupations. Genetic counselors assess clients for risk for various inherited conditions – including birth defects – which they assess clients for in order to provide genetic counseling services. Health information technologists and registrars advise organizations on computerized healthcare systems, while allied health professionals assist patients in performing daily living activities. Clinical laboratory technicians perform tests to detect and diagnose illness; massage therapists use pressure on soft tissues and joints of clients as treatment, while others. Radiation therapists determine and administer radiation doses to treat patients suffering from cancer or other serious diseases. Food service managers devise and oversee nutritional programs designed to promote health and prevent disease while managing a staff that handles large quantities of foods. Other healthcare jobs that pay above the national average include psychiatric aides, medical hygienists and nutritionists.